Fronpage Slideshow

Exploring the wreck

 

In the beam of my team diver Fredrik’s powerful HID light I glimpsed something coming closer below. It was definitely part of a wood hull and soon the full magnitude of its size became apparent to us. We are the first to land on Mars, and I couldn’t help giggling in my regulator. What we saw in front of us was an impressive hull side made out of solid oak and as we moved forward rows of canon port holes became visible.

The ships timbers are eroded by time but you can still feel how powerful and mighty this ship once was. Continuing South East following the hull towards what seemed to be the stern area we were baffled to find that we not only can look into what must have been admiral Bagges private quarters but we can dive into it as well. As we move into the darkness of the overhead my eyes opened wide, eager to receive every impression possible. It is in here that admiral Bagges’ fabled treasure must still be hidden and this was what the Danish-Lübeck attackers sought and the reason why they fought so fiercely. Did they plunder the loot or was it still here? The records fail to give the answer but I have a feeling future dives might. The treasure, real or not, eluded us this time and we moved out, pressing even deeper.

As we closed in on the sea bottom we passed into what looked like a milky mist and visibility is immediately reduced from 70 feet to just a few feet. We tightened up our formation and shared a quick light signal between the two of us confirming that all was ok. In the mist I spotted something that looked familiar and I head forward towards it. It was a canon! I couldn’t believe my eyes but it was a canon, a bronze canon almost five meters long. Its eerie eroded bronze green color was reflected in my light beam. “Canon, Canon!” I shouted out loud in my mouthpiece. I heard my words echo and it took me a few seconds to understand that Fredrik was also yelling. As I turned towards him I see the reason for his yelling and I find myself once again staring in disbelief.  Fredrik has found a pile of no less than seven canons all of different calibers. The size of the dolphins, handles, grapes, and rear handles of the larger ones are astonishing. This is better even than the best museum of my wildest dreams. I ponder this as I carefully and gently started to wipe off sediment from the back end of one of the canons. The contours of a crest became stronger and suddenly I could see what would become important evidence proving this wreck to be that of Mars. I could see the heraldic of the Swedish King Gustav Vasa. I could see a Crown above a shield with a coat of arm resembling a crossbow made out of corn inscribed. This was Mars the Magnificent!